Indigenous Medicine Stories:

Anishinaabe mshkiki nwii-dbaaddaan

All Episodes:

The Fine Line Between Traditional Healing and Western Medicine w/ Esstin McLeod

This episode features Esstin McLeod. Esstin (Niganobe), an Anishinaabe Kwe from the Mississaugi First Nations in Mid-Northern Ontario, is a Healer and Medicine Practitioner. She offers spiritual consultations and remedies to Native healthcare centers in Northern Ontario.

In her role as a Medicine Practitioner, Esstin provides plant-based remedies and instructional guidance. As a Healer, she works with spiritual energies, drawing on ceremonial practices and the teachings of Anishinaabe Elders.

With 30 years of study and experience, Esstin has developed a workshop series called "Anishinaabe Wisdom Healing." She also leads Anishinaabe women’s retreats and healing workshops, utilizing the Medicine Wheel for a holistic approach to health and healing.

 

Incorporating Traditional Healing into Practice w/ Dr. Karen Hill

This episode features Dr. Karen Hill. Karenna’onwe (Gaw-law-naw-oo-way) – Dr. Karen Hill is Mohawk from Six Nations of the Grand River Territory. She is the mother of two sons and step-mother to five daughters. She currently has 10 grandchildren and 2 great grandsons. She completed medical school in 2003 and Family Medicine Residency in 2005 - both from McMaster University. Prior to her medical career Karen worked to write curriculum and develop post-secondary programming at Six Nations Polytechnic, an Indigenous led post-secondary institution in her home community. 

 Karen’s passion is to see Traditional Indigenous Knowledge return to the centre of life for Indigenous people across Canada for the purpose of invoking healing. The fulfillment of this vision is foundational to her ongoing work in medicine, curriculum writing, teaching, co-creating spaces where Indigenous knowledge is brought into parallel with mainstream knowledge in education and health. 

 

Decolonizing Education: Impact on Indigenous Communities w/ Renee Linklater

This episode features Renee Linklater. A PhD who hails from the Rainy River First Nations in Northwestern Ontario. She earned her doctoral degree from the Department of Adult Education and Counselling Psychology at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. With two decades of experience, Renee has extensively collaborated with Aboriginal healing agencies and First Nation communities. Her roles have ranged from frontline work to program evaluation, curriculum development, and education/training in both health and education sectors. Presently, Renee serves as the Acting Director of Aboriginal Engagement and Outreach at the Provincial System Support Program, based at the Center for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) in Toronto.

 

Ancestral Echoes: A Journey to Reconciliation and Healing w/ Isaac Murdoch

Today's episode features Isaac Murdoch, also known by his Ojibwe name Manzinapkinegego’anaabe / Bombgiizhik, who hails from the Fish Clan and belongs to the Serpent River First Nation. Raised in the traditional lifestyle of hunting, fishing, and trapping, he dedicated many years to learning from Elders in the northern regions of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. Isaac is highly regarded as a storyteller and custodian of traditional knowledge.

 

Nurturing Ojibwe Wisdom through Language Revitalization

This episode features Dr. Wendy Makoons Geniusz, who hails from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and has ancestral roots in the Cree community of Manitoba. Currently serving as a professor at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Dr. Geniusz has been actively involved in projects aimed at revitalizing Ojibwe language and culture in Indigenous communities across the Great Lakes Region.

Mental Wellness and Renewed Frameworks w/ Dr. Carol Hopkins

This episode features Dr. Carol Hopkins from the Lenape Nation at Moraviantown, Ontario.  Dr. Hopkins is the CEO of the Thunderbird Partnership Foundation.  She is host of the podcast, Mino Bimaadiziwin.

Finding The Balance Of Your Being w/ Perry McLeod-Shabogesic

This episode features Perry McLeod-Shabogesic of the “Crane Clan” is an Ojibway Anishinabe from N’biising (Nipissing) First Nation (NFN). He has been a artist, cartoonist, writer, traditional helper, medicine harvester and cultural resource person in and around his community for many years.  Perry’s spirit name is “Aandzooked”, which means “Teller of sacred stories” in Ojibway.

Learning Our Teachings For Our Own Survival w/ Dr. Ed Connors

This episode features Dr. Ed Connors, an Indigenous Psychologist of Mohawk ancestry from Kahnawake Mohawk Territory. He has worked with First Nations communities across Canada since 1982, in both urban and rural centres.  His work over this time includes being Clinical Director for an infant mental health centre in the City of Regina, and Director for the Sacred Circle, a suicide prevention program developed to serve First Nations communities in Northwestern Ontario.  Dr. Connors’ most recent work has involved development of Indigenous Life Promotion Projects that includes Feather Carriers Leadership for Life Promotion. Dr. Connors works with Elders and has apprenticed in traditional approaches to healing. 

Onaubinisay, Walks Above the Ground pt2 w/Jim Dumont

This episode is the second part, featuring Jim Dumont, also known as Onaubinisay, meaning Walks Above the Ground. Jim Dumont is an internationally renowned Elder, speaker and traditional knowledge keeper. He is known as the Gichi-aya'aag, the Elder of the Elders and the Eastern Doorway of The Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge. In 2011, Jim was awarded a Doctor of Sacred Letters, the first of its kind at the University of Sudbury for his work in establishing the Department of Native Studies and designing and delivering the Indigenous knowledge courses. In 2015, he received a Doctorate of Anishinaabeg philosophy from the Seventh Generation Institute, and the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium.

Onaubinisay, Walks Above the Ground pt1 w/Jim Dumont

This episode features Jim Dumont, also known as Onaubinisay, meaning Walks Above the Ground. Jim Dumont is an internationally renowned Elder, speaker and traditional knowledge keeper. He is known as the Gichi-aya'aag, the Elder of the Elders and the Eastern Doorway of The Three Fires Midewiwin Lodge. In 2011, Jim was awarded a Doctor of Sacred Letters, the first of its kind at the University of Sudbury for his work in establishing the Department of Native Studies and designing and delivering the Indigenous knowledge courses. In 2015, he received a Doctorate of Anishinaabeg philosophy from the Seventh Generation Institute, and the World Indigenous Nations Higher Education Consortium.

How Indigenous Healing Intersects with Biomedicine w/ Diane Longboat

This episode features Diane Longboat, a member of the Turtle Clan and Mohawk Nation At Six Nations Grand River Territory, Ontario. She is a Ceremonial Leader, traditional teacher, healer, an elder. Diane is founder of Soul of the Mother, a healing lodge on the shores of the Grand River and Six Nations and has extensive relationships with First Nations in Canada and the United States. Diane is a professional educator with a master's degree in education, and has taught at universities and is a well known speaker on the topic of Traditional Indigenous knowledge systems and spirituality as the fuel for innovation. In this episode, Diane speaks of her journey as part of Indigenous social movements in the 1960s and 70s, particularly in the field of Indigenous Education. She also explains how Indigenous healing intersects with biomedicine. This recording took place that Soul of the Mother lodge in Six Nations Territory.

The Power of Spirit Can Facilitate Healing w/Hilton King

The second episode of "Indigenous Medicine Stories," showcases the inspiring journey of Hilton King, an Indigenous helper with a vast background in Indigenous mental health, addictions, justice, and child welfare, who currently dedicates his expertise to the Indigenous child and family services sector. As a trained social worker, Hilton humbly shares his personal experience of recovering from addictions through the transformative power of traditional healing. In this episode, he takes us on a profound exploration of Indigenous storytelling and the profound influence of spirit in facilitating healing. Hilton's authentic storytelling and deep connection to his Indigenous roots offer listeners a glimpse into the resilience and strength that can be found within Indigenous healing practices.

An Introduction to Indigenous Medicine Stories

This inaugural episode of "Indigenous Medicine Stories," features Dr. Darrel Manitowabi, the Hannah Chair in Indigenous Health and Indigenous Traditional Medicine at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine, as our guest and host of the podcast.

 

Welcome to Indigenous Medicine Stories

Indigenous Medicine Stories Podcast is a collaboration between AMS Healthcare and the Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Indigenous Health and Indigenous Traditional Medicine at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine University. It is hosted by Dr. Darrel Manitowabi, the NOSM-AMS Hannah Chair in the History of Indigenous Health and Indigenous Traditional Medicine .

About:

Indigenous Medicine Stories Podcast is a collaboration between AMS Healthcare and the Jason A. Hannah Chair in the History of Indigenous Health and Indigenous Traditional Medicine at the Northern Ontario School of Medicine University. Indigenous Medicine Stories aims to educate health professionals and the public about Indigenous healing. The podcast will highlight the lived experiences of Indigenous Knowledge holders, healers, and Elders and help professionals who practice Indigenous healing.

Since time immemorial, Indigenous Peoples held a knowledge system of wellness, healing, and medicine. Colonial processes such as Treaties, the Reserve system, the Indian Act of Canada,Residential Schools, child welfare policies, racism, discrimination, and excluding Indigenous healing in Western biomedicine and education have attempted to erase this knowledge system. Furthermore, until recently, the health education professions have played a role by excluding Indigenous knowledge from the curriculum. Also known as Anishinaabe mshkiki nwii-dbaaddaan (“I’m going to talk about Indigenous medicine”) in Anishinaaabemowin, medicine stories explore the perseverance and holism of Indigenous well-being and healing practices through the lived experiences of practitioners.